Results for: risky business

Emergency medicine, a risky business part 7: Risk proximity

Risk proximity is an important concept. In simple terms it just describes the time from an event happening and the risk potentially occuring. It’s not something that we often think about in the emergency department,

Emergency Medicine: A risky business part 6. How many steps to disaster?

So what do we mean by a miss exactly? Is it always a terrible thing and why is it that if we constantly miss diagnoses (we do you know) we are not in court every

Emergency Medicine, a risky business Part 5. Does a correct diagnosis mean that the therapy will work?

Emergency Medicine: A risky business part 5. Does a correct diagnosis mean that the therapy will work? In the previous post in this series around diagnostics we have looked at how the performance of most

St.Emlyn's

Emergency Medicine: A risky business Part 4

Welcome back to the 4th part of the series looking at understanding risk and diagnosis in Emergency Medicine. In part 3 we looked at how tests with apparently high sensitivities (e.g. 98% sensitivities) actually mean

Emergency Medicine, a risky business Part 3. How often is it acceptable for me to be wrong?

Emergency medicine is a risky business. In this continuing series looking at how we as emergency physicians look at risk we are going to spend a bit of time looking at how we feel about

Emergency Medicine, a risky business part 2.

How to consider thresholds for labelling in the diagnostic process. Diagnosis does not guarantee treatment success or failure.

EKG in inferior myocardial infarction

Emergency Medicine, a risky business part 1. You are not a diagnostician.

Time to think about whether you are really an emergency medicine diagnostician… Are you a diagnostician? Of course you are! Why do I even need to ask? Well, to be honest I’m no longer very

When is a Door Not a Door? Bias, Heuristics & Metacognition

This is an amended version of a talk on metacognition I gave at the Royal North Shore Hospital Grand Round. The clinical scenario has changed but the content remains the same. The purpose of this

JC: Do paediatric CT scans cause cancer? St.Emlyn’s

If I think back to my practice a few years ago (as I’m getting older) there is no doubt that the number of CT scans I’ve performed from the ED has increased. In both my

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EM Zen. Thinking about Thinking.

The Philosophy of Emergency Medicine. St.Emlyn’s has always had an interest in metacognition, thinking about thinking and many of our posts link to thought experiments on how we practice medicine. If you want to see


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